Fundraiser Print Breakdown

During my six-week fundraiser campaign to raise money for Photoville I managed to sell around 90 prints (85 people have contacted my with their choices, few answers are still missing). That's a huge amount compared to what I'm selling at usual pace. But usually I'm not doing any marketing either. Maybe I should, but that's a different topic.

Before we get to the number each print sold, I have to explain one thing. I built my campaign on the assumption that people do read and understand it. This was not the case ☺ When I asked people to pick prints weird things started to happen:

  • Some didn't want prints. Some didn't tell me they don't want ☺
  • Many hadn't even looked at the prints page.
  • Many people wanted lower level prints.
  • Many people wanted higher level prints.
  • Some people understood they can choose whatever print they want among my (whole body of) work.
  • Some didn't notice that these are unframed prints.
  • Many assumed I have their email/phone number/address/etc. Yes I do have many phone numbers, but imagine yourself looking up and rewriting 50+ phone numbers from the phone.

When the answers started coming back, I was very worried how to solve those conflicts. These people have actually put their money into my campaign, they made my New York exhibition possible - how can I tell them they don't get what they want? I waited a week thinking what I should do. If I stay strict and give people the pictures they don't want, they'll be unhappy, they won't hang it on their wall, they're unlikely to ever participate again in such campaign.

I made a hard decision - I'll limit people only by print size and let them choose the picture they want. I know that this is a little bit unjust to some, but I had to make some kind of compromise. This seemed like the best one. I really do apologize if you're the one affected by it in the bad way. If so - drop me a note and let's try to make a win-win situation out of it.

Now to the numbers (the captions match with those on the campaign page):

You might notice that nobody wanted the pictures on glass blocks nor glass blocks at all. I offered two ordinary prints on peoples' own choice instead of glass blocks, some took just one. I take this as a compliment actually - I hope these people really are going to hang them on the walls (it's not possible to hang the glass blocks, they're more like tabletop decoration).

While pictorialism leads the previous chart, here's another:

People actually bought black & white pictures. This is something that was a bit of a surprise for me and to be honest, and I like it. I like the idea of people hanging a nice and solid and not very big B&W picture that is not printed on canvas on the wall.  Hopefully nicely framed!